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Google Launches ‘Play Academy’ Free E-Learning Platform for Android App Developers

November 14, 2018 Posted by News 0 thoughts on “Google Launches ‘Play Academy’ Free E-Learning Platform for Android App Developers”

The Android ecosystem is one of the most flourishing app marketplaces and Google now wants to further bolster the same by giving its app developers access to free, bite-sized interactive sessions via its newly launched ‘Play Academy‘ e-learning platform.

While you could certainly head to YouTube today to learn pretty much anything, but Google has partnered with e-learning company Intellum to provide developers the right knowledge about managing their apps through the ‘Academy for App Success,’ as seen down below.

The ‘Play Academy’ offers Android app developers access to courses that can help them learn how to use the Play Console (the management back-end where you publish and manage Android apps), getting the most out of it, best practices for when you are ready to publish apps, and analyzing downloads (and other data) to grow your app.

These courses will ultimately enable them to upgrade their app, and add features to not just improve the quality of your app but bring in more business as well.

You can consume this material on either mobile or desktop to earn an achievement badge after you complete the task at hand. This will help you grow your know-how of the Play Console and managing Android apps, paving the way for you to become an industry expert.

While there are a number of sessions that are already live on Play Academy, Google says that more content, that too in languages other than English, will be added to the console shortly. So, you will be to learn the ABC of app development, managing the app and also monetizing it via this e-learning platform.

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Cross-platform frameworks brings one-code path to mobile dev

November 9, 2018 Posted by Apps, News 0 thoughts on “Cross-platform frameworks brings one-code path to mobile dev”

We’re one step closer to a mobile app developers dream: One day, they will share code across web and mobile, across Apple iOS and Google Android platforms.

Through open source cross-platform frameworks, such as NativeScript and React Native, developers can write one code base to create both native iOS and Android mobile apps. NativeScript, developed by Progress, a software company based in Boston, supports the Angular open source web development framework. React Native, developed by Facebook, is an extension of React JS.

With both cross-platform frameworks, developers can write code in JavaScript to develop true native apps. On the other hand, tools such as Adobe PhoneGap — now Apache Cordova — and Ionic, enable developers to run apps in a WebView, which displays web content in a native view, with native extensions, to create hybrid mobile apps.

At last week’s Progress conference in Boston, developers discussed the pros and cons of using cross-platform frameworks, such as NativeScript or React Native, to create native mobile apps.

It was all a dream

The creation of one code base that is easy to maintain and publishes well across multiple OSes is no easy feat, said Jonathan Marston, director of software at Optimus Ride, a self-driving car company in Boston. Tools such as Adobe Air have tried and failed to achieve it, he said.

“In the past, that dream has never lived up to the reality,” Marston said.

The ability to share code across multiple mobile OSes is getting more attainable with tools such as NativeScript and React Native, but the particular idiosyncrasies of each OS make it difficult to achieve complete code sharing, said Jesse Crossen, lead developer of VoiceThread, an education software company in Durham, N.C. For example, developers might want to write one set of code for an iOS visual component and another for an Android visual component, due to different screen sizes and resolutions.

“You’re always going to have that level of customization per platform or have [an app] that’s a little bit generic,” Crossen said.

NativeScript vs. React Native

Like coding languages, developers are fiercely dedicated to their preferred cross-platform framework. Organizations that need to decide which route to take should look at the skill sets of their development team, said Jason Wong, research director at Gartner. Developers that are familiar with React JS should develop apps with React Native, and those that use the Angular framework will be more comfortable with NativeScript.

The VoiceThread team ported its web app from the Adobe PhoneGap framework to React Native to make a mobile app, but it discovered React Native was not a good fit. The flexibility of NativeScript enabled the team to customize its complex app with plugins more easily than React Native did, he said.

“React is opinionated,” Crossen said. “It was an awkward fit. Our app is unusual. We quickly hit that point where we had to go outside the framework.”

Developers should also consider the open source community behind the framework, Wong said. React Native has a larger community of contributors than NativeScript, most likely due to the support of Facebook. NativeScript focuses on enterprise use cases more than React Native does, however, Wong said.

Glorified webpage

A hybrid app framework, such as Apache Cordova or Ionic, can also offer a native mobile feel, although it runs the app in a WebView.

Safety Insurance agency in Boston used Cordova to create a web-based app that is compatible with Android and iOS. Five years ago, hybrid apps suffered from performance issues because mobile devices didn’t have the strongest processing power, so NativeScript or React Native would’ve been a better option then, said Keith Carangelo, web development manager at the agency.

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How To Get Your First Developer Job

November 7, 2018 Posted by News 0 thoughts on “How To Get Your First Developer Job”

Here are some tips for finding your first developer job.  Define what type of role you want, then look for job postings for JR positions in that role. Check what type of skills they are looking for, learn the skills you don’t know and practice the ones that you do. .

?Make a portfolio. I would recommend creating a GitHub account , if you don’t have one, and create a public repo for each of your projects. Make sure each repo has a README which explains what the project does and how to run it locally. Also, It is very important that all your code is as clean as possible. ( Indentation, variables naming, comments, etc..) .

? Resume. Create a simple and consistent resume. I would recommend to just use a Google Docs template. Talk about your past experiences, side projects, and education. Try to match your experience with the requirements of the job you are trying to apply. .

?️‍♀️Before the interview. Practice as much as you can with coding exercises. Use something like LeetCode, Codewars or HackerRank.

? Interview. Practice your interview with other people. Make sure you know your resume well, and know about the company. Be early, polite and confident. You got this! There are loads of articles about how to approach the interview process, do your research. .

? Network. Network. Network. Put your self out there. Attend meetups, lectures, and hackatons. It’s important to start building your professional network even as a newcomer to the industry.

I hope this gives you an idea on what to do, but I still recommend doing your research on this subject. As I mentioned before, there are a lot of useful content about this topic on the web. Do your research.

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Google Releases The Official Android Dev Summit App

November 2, 2018 Posted by News 0 thoughts on “Google Releases The Official Android Dev Summit App”

With Google’s Android Developer Summit right around the corner, the company has announced the official app for the upcoming developer get-together.

The app lets you look through the conference schedule and all of the keynotes, sessions, and lightning talks that will take place over the two days. You can also save those events to your own calendar, they’re color-coded based on type (like breaks or sessions).

You can also stream the event from the app, though you can also stream it from the website if the app does not fit your needs.

As a nice bonus, the Android Dev Summit app also doubles as an Instant App. This lets you try out the app without needing to fully download it on your device. That is why you will see the “Open App” option when you get to the Android Dev Summit app on the Play Store.

As for the event itself, the Android Dev Summit is expected to bring together Android developers from various walks of life for two days of technical sessions with Google’s engineering team. There is even a keynote speech, which vice president of Android engineering Dave Burke and group product manager for Google Search and Ads Stephanie Cuthbertson hosted during 2017’s Android Dev Summit.

The discussions during this year’s Android Dev Summit will likely focus on the nitty-gritty of Android and its SDK tools. That compares drastically to Google I/O, which typically delivers more consumer-friendly news and developments.

You can download the Android Dev Summit 2018 app at the link below.The Android Dev Summit will be held in the Computer History Museum in California and go from November 7 through November 8.

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10-Year-Old Child Prodigy Turns down a Job Offer from Google

October 25, 2018 Posted by News 0 thoughts on “10-Year-Old Child Prodigy Turns down a Job Offer from Google”

At an age where most of us were lost in cartoons, Samaira Mehta is taking Silicon Valley by storm! The 10-year-old is a skilled programmer and has become somewhat of an icon for aspiring coders.

Samaira has developed Coder Bunnyz- a coding board game that teaches children all the concepts necessary in computer programming. She has already attended events by technology giants like Google and Microsoft as a keynote speaker!

Speaking to Medium, the coding prodigy says, “I always loved board games, and I always loved computer programming, but I didn’t like the fact that I had to do both of them separately, so I thought if I can’t bring board game onto a computer coding screen, so why not bring the computer coding to a board game. And that’s when I got the idea to create a coding board game, and that’s what I’m doing today.”

However, it wasn’t just developing an enjoyable board game that made her the talk of Silicon Valley.

Samaira’s father, Rakesh, who is an engineer at Intel and Sun Microsystems/Oracle, had a strategic business plan in mind for Coder Bunnyz.

It started with young Samaira testing the game with her friends so they could point errors and share feedback. Accordingly, Samaira refined Coder Bunnyz to perfection.

The duo didn’t stop at that. They arranged for coding workshops for kid coders which Samaira conducted. They also established a company to launch the game.

“I think the most interesting story that’s happened since I started my company was when I was doing a workshop, and the day before I looked at the sign-up sheet to see how many people signed up, and I saw two sign-up sheets were filled instead of 1. And so I told my dad, and he contacted the librarian, and it turned out they accidentally put up 2 sign up sheets instead of one, and so the next day, so many people came that we couldn’t accommodate all of them and we had to pair kids up, and some didn’t get to play. But in the end, it was all great, and everyone had a fun time!” shares Samaira.

Samaira’s workshop and the game are loved by most who meet her. In fact, from the moment she launched Coder Bunnyz, Samaira has conducted over 60 workshops in Silicon Valley which has been attended by about 2,000 kids.

Within a year, she also sold about 1,000 boxes of her game, worth $35,000 in all.

Source: Coder Bunnyz/ Facebook.

Samaira’s game has earned her the second prize from Think Tank Learning’s Pitchfest in 2016, which included $2,500. She also received the first “real life Powerpuff girls” prize from Cartoon Network.

Perhaps one of the best highlights in her journey was when she met Google’s Chief Culture Officer, Stacy Sullivan, after the young prodigy conducted a workshop for the tech giant.

“After my back-to-back workshops at Google headquarters, we talked for an hour. She told me I was doing great and once I get out of college, I can come work for Google,” Samaira told Business Insider.

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Understanding JavaScript Data Types and Variables

October 17, 2018 Posted by News, Programming 0 thoughts on “Understanding JavaScript Data Types and Variables”

Welcome, Fresh Coders!

If you’ve ever had the pleasure(or displeasure)of sitting through an Algebra 1 class, you’ve probably heard about variables. You know, x + 4 = 6 and all that good stuff. Don’t worry. JavaScript variables are much less scarier. You get to declare them so that you know exactly what they are. And, for the love of all that’s holy, don’t name your variables x or y or z. Give them reader-friendly names so that you’re not staring at a quadratic equation by the time you’re finished coding.

First, before we start messing around with variables and learning what variable deceleration even means, let’s learn to need them. By that I mean let’s get a little cozy with operators and data.

Data Types

Open up your Twitter or Instagram account and you’re hit with a log in screen prompting you to enter your information. When you enter your username and password, you’ve just entered data. You fill out a survey, you like a post, you order ten fidget spinners on Amazon — all of that is data.

In JavaScript, this data is divided into three groups:

1 ) Numbers

Numbers are exactly what you’ve known them to be all your life — 1, 50, 22.3, 5…Integers, decimals, fractions.

JavaScript is real friendly when it comes to numbers, because you don’t have to specify the type of number. We call this behavior untyped. JavaScript is untyped because determining whether a number is an integer or a decimal(float) is taken care of by the language’s runtime environment.

Why don’t you try entering typeof 5 into the editor and hit the run button. You should get 'number'.

Pro tip: typeof 5 is called a statement. You wrote JavaScript code and expected to get a value in return.

2) Strings: “Hello there”

Strings are simply fields of text. Even the words you’re reading now form a string. To encase these words, we use quotes. Keep in mind that strings aren’t limited to run-on sentences.

In JavaScript, this is also a string: "123";

typeof "1,2,3";
typeof "hello world";

You can probably guess by now that your passwords are stringy bytes of data.

3) Boolean: True, False

Don’t let the name throw you off. It’s the namesake of the mathematician George Bool. Booleans only have two values: true and false.

typeof true;
typeof false;

As you’ll come to know, these are important values when it comes to adding logic to our programs.With just those two values, you can create a complex system of loops and conditions.

But let’s not get ahead of ourselves. We will explore the depths of conditions and loops another time.

For now, let’s move onto what makes all of this data worthwhile.

Operators

What’s the use of data if you can’t do anything to it? That’s where operators come in. Each data type (Numbers, Strings, Boolean) share a set of operators that you can use to come up with nifty solutions to problems. There are four important categories of operators that you’ll use throughout your time as a JavaScript developer and they are

1)Arithmetic Operators

addition +

Number:1234 + 4579;

String:"hello" + "Jerry";

Yes, you can add a string. There’s a fancy term for this called string concatenation. Notice how the two strings glob together. We can solve this problem by adding an empty string in between.

"hello" + " " + "Jerry";

Boolean: true + false;

Performing arithmetic operations on boolean values actually returns a value. In this case, the value 1 isn’t just any ordinary 1. It’s a bitwise 1. In the language of computers, this translates to true. So, we can conclude that true plus false equals true.

Why is that so? You’ll understand once we turn true and false into what our computer actually sees.

computer:
true: 1, false: 0
result:
1 + 0 or 0 + 1 = 1

subtraction –

Number:1234 - 1234;
String: NaN Note: NaN(Not a Number) is the error you’ll get when you try to subtract String values.
Boolean: true - false; or false - true;

division /

Number:1234 / 1234;
String: NaN
Boolean: true / false; or false/true;

multiplication /

Number:1234 * 1234;
String: NaN
Boolean: true * false; or false * true;

modulo %

This cool operator tells us the remainder of a division of two values.

Number: 10%3;String: NaNBoolean: true % false; or false % true;

Increment ++

++ is a fancy way to say add 1 to any value. It matters where you put the incrementer. Oh, and by the way, we need variables now. JavaScript’s interpreter can’t read ++10 if 10 is not saved inside a variable. why? Because plus, plus is what we call syntactic sugar. It’s something that was created to make life easier for developers, because it turns out we’re pretty lazy. Instead of saying 10 + 1, we get to forgo adding the 1. Since plus,plus is technically not a real arithmetic operator, you need to define a variable so that you won’t get errors.

Before we start our lesson on variables, try playing around with them. Type this into a code editor:

var cookies = 5;
console.log(cookies++); > 5
console.log(++cookies); > 7

The variable names are arbitrary. You can name them whatever you like. As we’ll explore later, it’s best to name them appropriately.

Pro tip: var cookies = 5; is called an expression. You defined what value cookie has but you didn’t ask for its value. As you learned earlier, this would be a statement: cookies;

Note: console.log() is a web tool that prints JavaScript code to a console. Every web browser has a console you can access. This “web tool” is really called a Web API. It’s much easier to think of API’s as a set of tools that make your job a whole lot easier.

So…why are we not getting the values we expect???

Well, writing the variable before ++ gives us the original value before it can be incremented and vice versa.

Think of it this way: we asked the baker for 5 cookies before he knew we wanted to add one more to the order(cookies | ++).

We receive a receipt saying we ordered five, but when we ask for one more, the baker runs back to get us one more(so, we have 6 cookies now).

The baker returns, but we ask for one more again(++ | cookies).

Finally, when we ask for our cookies, our total is 7 cookies.

JavaScript’s interpreter is that poor baker when it comes to incrementing and decrementing.

decrement — –

Number: -- number

String: NaN
Boolean: --true

+= Plus Equals, and -= Minus Equals, and *= Times Equals, and /= Divided Equals

It turns out programmers are lazier than you thought. Yes, there are more arithmetic shortcuts.

Say you have var score = 5; and, instead of incrementing score by 1, you want to increment it by 6.

Normally you’d write score = score + 6;

With Plus Equals you simply have to write it as score += 6;
Why don’t you try it out with different operators?

2. Comparison Operators

logical operators return true or false. Without them, we wouldn’t have all of the apps that are available to us.

operators

equals ==
not equal !=
greater >
less <
greater/equal< =
less/equal> =

There’s also a special triple equals(===). This checks to make sure that the types are the same as well.

Try this out: 3 == '3';. You got true, right? The fact that JavaScript ignored our stringed ‘3’ can cause some unwanted bugs. To fix this, add another equals. Now you should get false. That’s because triple equals also ensures that the types are exactly the same as well.

Operators are useful for conditional logic. Let’s use an if/else statement to test out an equals operator.

If ('you feel overwhelmed by this new topic'){
 'Do not worry. Sometimes the best way to learn is to try and fail'
}else {
 'Let's get this show on the road!'
}

Try this real if/else statement.

if(2==3){
 console.log('correctomundo');
}else {
console.log('wrooong');
}

Note: the end of if statements don’t receive semi-colons. Here’s a pro tip: Exclude them from any statements or expressions ending in a bracket.
Be sure to use different data types in your if/else statement. You can even play around with all of the operators you’ve learned so far.

3. Logical Operators

Logical and &&, Logical or||, Logical not !

Logical operators allows us to add complexity to our conditional statements. Practically, if you want maximum control over a condition, you’d use && because all of the conditions must be met in order to be true. Conversely, if you want the condition to be more inclusive, you’d use || because only one condition has to be true to get a return value of true.

if(2==2&&3==3&&3==2){
 console.log('correctomundo');
}else {
console.log('wrooong');
}

Variables, Finally!

So, you were introduced to variables prematurely. Even then, you saw how badly we needed a variable in order to get the increment and decrement operator working.
Now, let’s think of numbers, strings, and booleans as Snap chat photos that ghost away after a short period. They don’t stay around long enough to be useful. If you want to use the same data, you’d have to re-type it somewhere else in your JavaScript file.

Imagine having to write this formula over and over again: 1/2(60 * 120);

Or this really long string: "superkalafragilisticespialadocious";.

What a variable does is allow us to save data so that we can use it again.
Let’s declare two variables

var triangleArea, poppinsQoute;

Now for some takeaways:

The var keyword creates what’s called a global variable. It’s like taking a shower in public. Everyone can see you. In JavaScript, we have blocks, like neighborhood blocks. Within our if/else statements, we wrote a block of code that only ran based on certain conditions. Those two variables can be accessed within that block, because we declared them in a global scope.

Think of scope as perspective. From the perspective of the outside, we can’t always see what is inside someone’s house. But from the inside, we can see everything that’s outside.

We shouldn’t be able to look inside an if/else statement and see its local variables. Local variables are variables that are declared within a block.
pro tip: any code within curly braces form a block.

if(3==3){
 var number = 3;
}

Notice the assignment operator. In this example, I’ve declared and initialized my variable at the same time. The equals sign in this case is not the same as the equal sign you use in math. It simply means that you want to assign particular data to a variable you made up. The operator used is called an assignment operator.

Alright. Remember what I mentioned about global and local variables. You’re probably guessing that if I were to use this variable outside of the block, we should get an error.

if(3==3){
 var number = 3;
}
console.log(number);

Wait…we were still able to access the variable outside of the block. Did we just acquire X-Ray vision? So all this talk about local and global variables must be a lie then, right?

Well, the problem with the var keyword is that it loves to expose itself in public. Even if it’s defined within a block, it’ll still want to be seen by everyone. The only thing that can tame it is a function.

function test(){
  var number = 3;
}
console.log(3);

We will get into functions another time, but all you need to know for now is that functions create their own scope. They’re like highly secured mansions.
That’s all fine and dandy that functions are so secure, but how do I secure an if/else statement?

There is a new way to declare variables as of Es6. Every so often Ecma International comes up with new ways for us to code in JavaScript. What they’ve come up with to solve this issue is the let keyword.

Let’s use it!

if(3==3){
 let number = 3;
}
console.log(number);

Great. Now we truly have global and local variables.

Going back to our original variable declarations, var triangleArea, poppinsQoute;, you can see that we are able to declare multiple variables at the same time by separating them with a comma. Also, look at how the second word in the variable name starts off with a capitalized letter. This convention is called camel case. It’s good to stick to this convention so that your code is legible to you and to others that might look at your code one day.

The Variable Warehouse

We’ve messed around with variables a little, but we haven’t pushed them to the limit. Let’s see what we can put inside of a variable.

numerical statement

triangleArea = 1/2(60 * 120);

strings

poppinsQoute = "superkalafragilisticespialadocious";

boolean

let true_ = true;

Wait. Why the underscore? See, you can’t name a variable anything that is already named by those who’ve designed the language. Just make sure that you don’t start naming your variables with numbers: 123true.

logical statement

let check = (2==2&&3==3&&4==4);

The parenthesis is there for readability. You can plug this right into your if statement and it’ll work beautifully.

if(check){
 console.log("true");
}

Pro tip: I did not have to type check === true because the if statement automatically checks for true or false.

functions

var myFunction = function(){
  return 'hello';
}

variables also consume functions. These functions are called anonymous functions because they aren’t named.

arrays

var myArray = [1,3,4,5];

Arrays are a collection of data.

objects

var myObject = {me: "too", save: "me"};

Objects also hold a collection of data.

Other variables.

var newVariable = oldVariable;

Multiple variables!

var varOne = varTwo = varThree = 1;

Don’t try this one at home, because it has unwanted side effects. Variable assignment works from right to left. So in order for varOne to finally receive value, the other two variables are pushed to the global scope automatically. This means even functions won’t recognize varTwo and varThree as local variables. This is called leaking and is a pretty big no,no.

Closing Note

Variables are here to stay so make sure you get into the habit of using them. Whenever you find yourself using the same data type repeatedly, try sticking it into a variable. You’ll be happy you did.

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Facebook opens Audience Network SDK beta program for developers, publishers

October 16, 2018 Posted by News 0 thoughts on “Facebook opens Audience Network SDK beta program for developers, publishers”

Facebook’s Audience Network platform allows brands and advertisers to push their Facebook ad campaigns beyond the social media platform. Having early access to an Audience Network SDK Beta program gives publishers and developers a head-start to using the new tool — it will offer them a chance to provide feedback on how the SDK can be improved before its launch.

“The input we receive from our developers and publishers is a valuable part in building and improving our solutions,” wrote Facebook on its Developer blog announcing the beta program. Facebook says input from users helps its team determine issues and create new features.

According to Facebook, Audience Network SDK beta users will have first-look access to the platform’s latest ad formats and tools, and will be able to use them immediately from the app. Among some of the features in the latest beta version, 5.0, are a reporting flow for Native Ads, multi-process support for Interstitial and Rewarded Video formats, a new Interstitial design for Mobile App Install ads.

Facebook has launched the beta program approximately one month prior to the official roll out.

More on the Audience Network SDK beta program

  • For publishers and developers interested in applying to the beta program, Facebook shared a link to its Business Manager site.
  • Those accepted into the beta program can earn Facebook advertising credits and connect with other beta testers in a closed developer community.
  • Facebook expects the official roll out for the SDK to happen around mid-November.
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Top 5 Web development trends in 2018

October 9, 2018 Posted by News 0 thoughts on “Top 5 Web development trends in 2018”

New competitors pop up every day, so you have to keep your audience’s attention long enough to turn them into conversions. Web developers have also got a crucial role to play when it comes to catching and keeping the user’s attention, and they can do the same using some smart tactics.

In keeping with the times, here are the top 5 trends in web development that every developer should watch out for, and ensure the implementation of the same for better conversion rates. Exceed your customers’ expectations by dishing out something extra, and these 5 web development trends can tell you the ways to do it!

1. Revamped landing pages

Landing pages have gone through an unending process of transformation. Moving past the text-heavy landing page formats, we have come to light landing pages that focus more on the information being readily accessible to the user. Since Internet users do not care to read even a third of what you write as content, it is best to keep the text to a bare minimum when it comes to designing your landing pages. Use riveting web design templates and features (and tonnes of CTAs) on your landing page to cater to the streamlined queries and problems of your users.

2. Age of static site generators

Dynamic site content can readily be turned into static ones using static site generators. This is the go-to tool for most bloggers of the modern age. It ensures keeping a low budget and enhanced site loading speed, making your content accessible to users. Security factors can also be taken care of using static site generators, and you can convert plain text into creative websites using these site generators. Web developers who like to work on light software that runs on all servers can heavily benefit from this trend for sure.

3. Featuring hero images and videos

Go to your browser and open the homepages of Samsung or Nike. The first thing that greets you is a big and bold image of happy faces featuring their products. Since human brains process visuals way faster than text, why not take advantage of the same and create your website around it? Using hero images that feature in the homepage section of your website is thus a trend that is here to stay. The same goes for big and bold geometric patterns and fonts. If you want an even better effect, go for a slideshow format and stuff up that homepage with three or more hero images! The same goes for videos too. Videos help engage audiences faster and a few seconds of captivating content is enough to keep them hooked to your website for long. As a web developer, you should keep this trend in mind the next time you meet with your team to discuss alterations you can bring to your website.

4. Chatbots and interactive UI to the fore

Live chats and chatbots are ringing in a new age in conversational UI. They make our lives way simpler and take care of auto-reply functions with ease. Incorporating the same for your website can be one of the best ways for you to ensure engagement and a better user experience. Virtual assistants help users to shop and assist them to choose from products and cater to their problems or queries, which is the next big things in web development. It also helps users overcome the barrier of having to go through complicated processes of navigating through your site by including a simple chatbot-powered interactive feature to your website.

5. The rise of the JavaScript

2017 was the year of JavaScript with brilliant frameworks, technologies, and libraries. Riding on the JavaScript wave this year comes to the fundamentals that web developers need to get to the bottom of. Functions of JavaScript like the Builtin method, Closures, ES6, Pure Functions, Callbacks, RAIL, Promises, and Node have got the web developers around the world sitting up and taking notice. Since JavaScript also has the REACT library for building user interfaces, it can be the go-to solution for every web developer worth his coding skills this year as well. Combine frameworks like Meteor with resources from the library, and you will pave your way to a better website interface in the future.

Final Thoughts

Whether it is assisting users to shop online with just a live chat conversation with a chatbot or making websites way more engaging with loads of video content, keep the 5 brilliant web development trends in mind when developing your strategy for this year. Ensure smooth functioning of every feature in your website, catering to the mobile-only audience group, and make the all-around UX an enjoyable and efficient one. As a web developer of the modern age, that’s what you should be focusing on anyway. Since the industry keeps transforming itself with every new function added to a coding language or resource, brace yourself for the next major upheavals in web development.

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Node.js Foundation and JS Foundation Announce Intent to Create Joint Organization to Support the Broad Node.js and JavaScript Communities

October 4, 2018 Posted by News, Programming 0 thoughts on “Node.js Foundation and JS Foundation Announce Intent to Create Joint Organization to Support the Broad Node.js and JavaScript Communities”

The Node.js Foundation and JS Foundation today announced an intent to merge. A Q&A session will be held onsite at Node+JS Interactive from 7:30am – 8:30am PT, October 10 at West Ballroom A. Anyone attending Node+JS Interactive is welcome to attend; questions can be submitted in advance anonymously via this Google Form.

Leaders from the Node.js Foundation Board of Directors, Technical Steering Committee and Community Committee will join representatives from the JS Foundation Board of Directors and Technical Advisory Committee to facilitate the discussion, answer questions and solicit community input on the possible structure of a new Foundation. Joining forces will not change the technical independence or autonomy for Node.js or any of the 28 JS Foundation projects such as Appium, ESLint, or jQuery.

JavaScript is a versatile programming language that has expanded far beyond its role as a backbone of the web, entering new environments such as IoT, native apps, DevOps, and protocols. As the ecosystem continues to evolve — moving from browsers to servers, desktop applications to embedded devices — increased collaboration in the JavaScript ecosystem is more important than ever to sustain continued and healthy growth.

“The Node.js Foundation and JS Foundation boards have met several times already to discuss a potential alignment of the communities. The Foundation leaders and key technical stakeholders believe that a tighter alignment of communities will expand the scope of the current Foundations and enable greater support for Node.js and a broader range of JavaScript projects,” said Mike Dolan, Vice President of Strategic Programs, the Linux Foundation.

“We are very interested in hearing directly from the community and welcome all questions, ideas and opinions so that the structure aligns with the expectations of the community. For this reason, no formal decisions regarding a merged Foundation and its potential organizational structure, governance policies, technical framework or leadership have been made at this point and will be formalized based on feedback from the community.”

Additional goals for a merger include:

  • Enhanced operational excellence;
  • Streamlined member engagement;
  • Increased collaboration across the JavaScript ecosystem and affiliated standards bodies;
  • An “umbrella” project structure that brings stronger collaboration across all JavaScript projects; and
  • A single, clear home available for any project in the JavaScript ecosystem.

Today, JavaScript is nearly ubiquitous. Enterprises have been able to greatly reduce training costs and increase developer productivity because frontend JS developers can work on the server side, and vice-versa, eliminating the context switches and enabling all developers to pull from the same knowledge base and vast module ecosystem. Node.js is a major catalyst for this growth. It has become an important part of the modern web development stack and is often the assumed default when working with JavaScript. Merging the Foundations will bring the governance of these technologies in line with its real-world use.

“JavaScript is at the core of an ecosystem of technologies that form the backbone of the web and play an increasingly vital role across industry and society,” said Dan Appelquist, Director of Web Advocacy & Open Source at Samsung Research UK and JSF Board Member. “Strong governance, encouraging inclusive contributor communities and engagement in the ongoing standards development are all important factors in ensuring this ecosystem continues healthy development. A merged foundation is well positioned to deliver on these goals.”

“The possibility of a combined Foundation and the synergistic enhancements this can bring to end users is exciting,” said Todd Moore, Node.js Board Chairperson and IBM VP Opentech. “Our ecosystem can only grow stronger and the Foundations ability to support the contributors to the many great projects involved improve as a result.”

About the Node.js Foundation
Node.js is used by tens of thousands of organizations in more than 200 countries and has around 10 million users. It is the runtime of choice for high-performance, low latency applications, powering everything from enterprise applications, robots, API engines, cloud stacks and mobile websites.

The Foundation’s membership base includes Platinum members Google, IBM, Intel, Joyent, and Microsoft. Gold members include GoDaddy, PayPal, and NodeSource, and Silver members include Bitnami, Chef, Dynatrace, Fidelity, Groupon, HackerOne, NearForm, npm, Oath:, Profound Logic, Red Hat, RisingStack, SafetyCulture, Sauce Labs, Snyk, and YLD. Get involved here: https://foundation.nodejs.org.

About the JS Foundation
The JS Foundation’s mission is to drive broad adoption and ongoing development of key JavaScript solutions and related technologies through ongoing efforts and services such as mentorship programs, events and support of web standards. The JS Foundation works to facilitate collaboration within the JavaScript development community to ensure its projects maintain the quality and diverse contribution bases that provide for long-term sustainability.

The Foundation is supported by members IBM and Samsung (Platinum); Accenture (Gold); and Agile FAQs, Blog Starter, BLOQspace, Bocoup, BrowserStack, Cloud Grey, Kenzan, Particle, Ripple, Sauce Labs, SitePen, Sourcegraph, StackPath, WebsiteSetup, and White October Events (Silver). Learn more about the members who support the Foundation and how to join at https://js.foundation/about/members.

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Google’s new rules for developers make Chrome extensions safer

October 3, 2018 Posted by News 0 thoughts on “Google’s new rules for developers make Chrome extensions safer”

Google has announced a range of security changes to its Chrome browser that will make the use of extensions more secure. The updates, to be introduced in version 70 of the popular browser, cover areas including extension permissions and developer accounts.

Browser extensions are small programs that enhance its functionality. The problem is that misbehaving extensions can steal data or invade users’ browser privacy. Chrome is a trusted application in most operating systems, meaning that if you give an extension permission to do things, the operating system will usually wave it through. This can leave users vulnerable to malicious extensions.

In the past, Google has taken steps to keep extensions in line by limiting what they can do. Late last year, for example, it introduced an optional site isolation feature that made it more difficult for malicious code on one site to steal secrets from another when open in the browser. It also enabled administrators to block extensions based on the kinds of permissions they request, such as access to the webcam or the clipboard.

Per-site permissions

Now, it has announced plans to take things further. In Chrome 70, the company will enable users to restrict an extension’s permissions to manipulate website data and services on a per-site basis. When users gave a Chrome extension permission to read and change website data in the past, the extension could use those permissions across all sites. The change allows users to be more selective about the sites that the extension can access.

While you may want a screen clipping extension to read information from a handful of news sites that you visit, say, you might want it to avoid reading anything else, including your online bank account. Chrome 70 will restrict host access permissions to specific sites allowed by the user, or it can be configured to request approval for host access when visiting any site. The user can also enable host permissions on all sites by default if they wish.

Google will also make the review process more stringent for extensions that request ‘powerful permissions’, it said, and will also monitor extensions that use code hosted remotely.

Obfuscated code banned

The company is also banning the use of obfuscated code. This is JavaScript code that is scrambled to avoid others finding out what it does, and while this can be a way for developers to protect their IP, a good reverse engineer would eventually work out what it was doing, Google pointed out.

In the meantime, obfuscated code also enables cybercriminals, such as cryptojackers, to execute nefarious code under the hood. From now on, Google’s Chromium team is having none of it. Not only will all new extension submissions have to carry usable code, but existing extensions with obfuscated code will be removed from the Chrome Web Store in early January if they don’t fix the issue. The company said:

Today over 70% of malicious and policy violating extensions that we block from Chrome Web Store contain obfuscated code. At the same time, because obfuscation is mainly used to conceal code functionality, it adds a great deal of complexity to our review process. This is no longer acceptable given the aforementioned review process changes.

Minification, which reduces side code by removing comments and unused code and shortening variables, is still fine, it added.

2FA for extension developers

Google also changed the requirements for developers to access their online accounts. They will be expected to use two-step verification (or 2FA) to access their accounts in the Chrome Web Store from next year, the company stated. This is a bid to protect developers of popular extensions from having their accounts hijacked and their published extensions tampered with by malicious actors.

These enhancements may go some way towards mitigating malicious Chrome extensions, of which there have been a few.

One popular legitimate extension called Web Developer for Chrome was hijacked last year after criminals compromised the developer’s account.

Another extension named “Desbloquear Conteúdo” was evil from the start, inserting a perfect overlay of username, password, and one time pad form fields on a bank’s site.

Another extension named “Desbloquear Conteúdo” was evil from the start, inserting a perfect overlay of username, password, and one time pad form fields on a bank’s site.

The security changes are a precursor to version 3 of Google’s extensions manifest, which will make it harder to write insecure extensions, the company claimed. These changes will include more narrowly-scoped application programming interfaces (APIs) so that developers can give extensions more selective access to webpages. Expect those new changes next year.

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